Search Results for: Klondike Gold Rush

The Klondike Gold Rush Steamers

In these days of highways and 1000-year level flood dikes, it’s easy to forget that the best way to get to Dawson used to be by sternwheelers. While most of the stampeders made their way here in small boats and rafts in 1898, a sizeable number cruised to the fledgling town from St. Michael’s, Alaska, in riverboats and steamers and, once the White Pass chugged into Whitehorse, still more hopped on boats from there.

Family fortune tied to the Klondike Gold Rush

U.S. President Donald Trump’s grandfather started the family fortune during the great Klondike Gold Rush. He never reached the Klondike Gold Fields; he was hundreds of miles short.

The Cancan Arrives at the Klondike Gold Rush

On November 28, 1891, the New York Sun dedicated a full page to the cancan. Titled “Eccentric Paris Dance,” the article highlights Paris cancan stars of the day who describe intricate cancan dance moves. After the two decades of being attacked in the press by misogynist newspaper editors and pious moral reformers, the Sun article …

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125 years of gold

2021 marks 125 years since the discovery of gold in the Yukon. This year there is a series of new commemorative activities.

The Legacy of the Klondike Cancan

The cancan that began as an 1830s dance craze in Paris was a direct revolt against the rules imposed by men, society, press, clergy and narrow-minded citizens. From the beginning the cancan was a statement, and it became a symbolic statement through the various revolutions and movements from that point forward. As the great cancan …

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Gold Fever is Alive and Well

Panning for gold the old-fashioned way is an art and a science, though you don’t have to be an expert in either to take part in the annual Yukon Gold Panning Championships, held on Saturday, July 1 in Dawson City. “We’re trying to attract gold panning enthusiasts, competitive types, visitors, and first time gold panners,” …

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Rocking the Klondike

116th Brier, an event that started in the Klondike Gold Rush and is considered the Yukon’s oldest continuously running event.

Talking Points about “Klondike” for our summer visitors

There’s all sorts of misinformation about the Klondike Gold Rush out there. One of the most obvious is that a lot of Americans, other than the ones who live in the big state next door to us, still think the Klondike is in Alaska. Granted that the vast majority of the stampeders came from the …

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Klondike Catwalk

In a show of pre-season energy akin to athletes’ pre-game excitement, Parks Canada interpreters Carrie Docken and Carly Sims gallantly put on their copies of 100-year-old fashion and posed for What’s Up Yukon last week in Dawson City. Sims’ tea dress is a replica of the styles Martha Black and other Klondike pioneering women, of …

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Klondike History Comes Alive

DAWSON CITY For many people, coming to the Yukon means coming to Dawson City. Located in the heart of the Klondike, Dawson is one of the most recognizable places in the territory. Known for the Klondike Gold Rush with its colourful history and unforgettable characters, Dawson is a town just waiting to be explored. Who …

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Parade with old fire truck and Can-Can Dancer

Celebrating Yukon’s Unique Holiday

Celebrating Discovery Days in the Yukon goes back over 100 years. After the Klondike Gold Rush, the Yukon Order of Pioneers convinced the Yukon Territorial Council to celebrate Discovery Day, as a public holiday, in 1911.

In pursuit of the perfect shot

The Porcupine Caribou Herd is thought to have the longest mammal migration on the planet. The image I wanted to capture is hard to describe, but while doing research on the caribou, I saw videos of them in winter, migrating in long lines of thousands. It reminded me of images of the Klondike Gold Rush a hundred years ago, where there was a line of 400 men following a trail straight up the mountain.

Stonecliff brings together a remarkable team of artists (Part 2 of 2)

The new musical drama Stonecliff tells the story of Michael J. Heney, the son of poor Irish immigrants in the Ottawa Valley who went on to build one of the world’s most spectacular railways – the White Pass and Yukon Route – to serve the Klondike Gold Rush in 1898.

Dredge No. 4

Exploring the Yukon’s ‘Paris of the North’

Back in the late 1800s, Dawson City was the most-populated northern town, the “Paris of the North.” The famous Klondike Gold Rush started in 1896, when gold was found at Bonanza Creek. Within a few years, about 100,000 prospectors, miners, prostitutes, wives, children and others travelled the world, passing frozen rivers and mountains, to settle …

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Finding Connections to Their Northern Roots

Yann Herry is drawn to true stories of daring. Ask him about his favourite characters in the Yukon’s Francophone history and he’ll tell you about the people who took chances, cut their own trails and lived their dreams. “It’s the French-Canadian spirit, going back to the voyageurs,” he said. “We’ve always been pulled toward big …

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Regulars and Rooms for Rent

Compared to the Klondike-era poems we’re familiar with, it seems that Tara Borin’s poetry breaks ground by presenting a post-gold rush, post-Robert Service perspective of Dawson.

Copper Haul Staging Area

Copper Haul Road The Copper Haul Road is the “main line” of the The Great Trail for the Whitehorse area.  It is a class 3 trail running north/south just west of urban Whitehorse.  The trail is designated “multi-use”, so users should expect to be sharing the trail with snowmobilers, skiiers, dog teams, hikers, bikers, horses, …

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Silver Linings

Artists and Parks Canada heritage interpreters, Justin Apperley (left) and Miriam Behman, with their field camera Photography played a key role in the history and mythology of the Klondike Gold Rush. The photographer’s lens bore witness to the thrum and commotion of the stampede, along with the turmoil it wrought. The impacts of this era …

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MacBride Museum

MacBride Museum

MacBride Museum  Yukon’s first —and recently expanded – museum offers a comprehensive view of the resilient people and groundbreaking events that have shaped the territory’s history. Home to 40,000 objects, our galleries illustrate stories from Yukon First Nations, the natural world, the Klondike Gold Rush and more. Our Icons gallery showcases our unforgettable places and …

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Early geological mapping – Part 2

One project was to traverse and map the Mackenzie Mountains near the Yukon-NWT border by Joseph Keele who spent an entire year in 1907-08.

98 Hotel

98 Hotel

98 Hotel The ’98 Hotel is an historic hotel in the heart of beautiful downtown Whitehorse, Yukon. We have the second oldest saloon license west of Winnipeg! The name refers to the Klondike Gold Rush of 1898, which is the largest gold rush in the history of the world. The grand opening of the ‘98 …

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John Firth

John was raised in Dawson City, Yukon, where the Klondike Gold Rush was his backyard. He worked as a journalist, sewer rat, heavy equipment operator, prospector, public relations director, theatre owner and financial planner before retiring to become a full-time writer.John Firth is our own contemporary Yukon storyteller.  Firth’s books profile a wide variety of subject …

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Early Geological Mapping

The earliest geology maps of the Yukon show only the rocks that line the rivers. You traveled by boat, mapping as you went. 

In the footsteps of her great-grandfather

In 1898, Ione Christensen’s great-grandfather and his four sons hiked the Chilkoot Trail on their way to find fortune in the Klondike gold fields. Over her lifetime, Christensen, who recently turned 86, has spent a lot of time on the historic trail herself.

Podcasting for fun and fortune

I know computers and have taught school students the miracles of manipulating music and noise with software. I could turn my stories into podcasts!

The Joy of Northern Kleptoparasiticpredation

There are two sides to every story, sometimes more. Entry-level journalism students are taught, ad nauseum, by wizened old editors to strive to present both, or all of these sides, to their readers in order to honour the elusive literary gold standard called “objectivity.” Of course, there is an opposing viewpoint which proclaims that objective …

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For more than 30 years Doug Davidge has helped solve Yukon’s historic mysteries, both hidden and exposed

Doug Davidge finds lost things.  Over the course of more than three decades in the Yukon, Davidge has been known to find things that people know are missing–such as the A.J. Goddard, a steamboat that vanished in Lake Laberge in 1901–and things that people might not even realize are lost. For example, a few years ago …

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Main Street or bust

Rolf Hougen stands with Harreson Tanner beside the bust of Sam Steele that he commissioned Chuck Buchanan to sculpt as part of the centennial RCMP celebration in 1992 What do Jack London, Martha Black, Pierre Berton and Ted Harrison have in common? They’ve all been commissioned by Rolf Hougen to be sculpted by Harreson Tanner …

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When life hands you lemons …

… have a drink of lemonade on August 7 [three_fourth] Two Yukon organizations are making lemonade centre stage this summer. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Yukon is hosting the second annual Big Squeeze Lemonade Stand Competition and the Yukon Transportation Museum is sharing Klondike Gold Rush history with a lemony twist. The museum has taken …

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The Chilkoot Trail allows for exploration of more than the wilderness

Hannah Perrine Mode’s pieces “Scattered Light, Low Clouds” and “Now We Can Hold Time,” are tied closely to the landscapes where they were created: the northern California coast, Joshua Tree, Lake Tahoe, Desolation Wilderness, Walden Pond, Oakland, Antarctica and the Mendenhall Glacier, respectively Hannah Perrine Mode’s art practice exists at the confluence of visual art, …

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Where the Trump family fortune got started

“I’m a fifty-pager,” says Whitehorse writer Pat Ellis, commenting on her preference for producing short history booklets. Her latest, Financial Sourdough Starter Stories—“The Trump Family, from Whitehorse to White House,” the “Klondike Gold Rush” and “Harry Truman and the A-Bomb”—tops out at 64 pages, but the concept remains the same. “I’ve done a squatter book …

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Inspired by ‘place’

Anto Yukon’s 100 per cent natural and vegan soaps and essential oils are inspired by by the artist’s favourite Canadian landscapes.

Art meets nature and history

Miles Canyon holds a special place in the story of Whitehorse. Each summer, the Yukon Conservation Society invites Yukon artists to participate in a two-day workshop to create pieces inspired by this special place.

Kathleen & Kokanee in Kluane – Part 3 of 6

Kathleen Lake, which is the only place in Kluane National Park you can sleep (legally) if you have rubber wheels for your mode of transportation (rather than flying machines, skis, hiking boots or birchbark).

A Kenai kickoff to a new series – Part 1 of 6

Homer, on the west side of the Kenai Peninsula, is the farthest south you can drive and became my favourite place to RV camp in Alaska because of this surprise: it felt like California.

Al Oster

The Yukon Balladeer

Al Oster plays in Hougens in 1961 – PHOTOS: courtesy of Rolf Hougen This article uses information and content shared by Rolf Hougen from the HougenGroup.com website to commemorate Al Oster.Our Yukon heritage is a mix of different traditions and different eras, including First Nations history, gold rush stories, the construction of the Alaska Highway …

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Sourdough Rendezvous Dereen Hildebrand Business Decor Contest

Ready, set, paint your windows!

Brenda Buren (left) and Lindsay Agar (right) present staff from BMO ribbons for Best Bank and Best Overall in the 2017 Business Decor Competition Yukon businesses have been celebrating Yukon Sourdough Rendezvous with window painting and decorating for decades. The festive atmosphere builds anticipation for the event and helps cultivate the Klondike Gold Rush-era feel …

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Canadian Red

Ever since I was a child I would see the Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers and think, “Wow! Our national police force is beyond cool!” Today, I still think that. The Mounties definitely know how put on a good horse show and parade. Located throughout every province and territory, the RCMP are there to “stand …

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Celebrating the Power of Art

A mural festival in the Yukon will draw artists, youth, and the general public together to decorate some buildings in Whitehorse with a colourful palette. The 2-month long Yukon Heritage Mural Art Festival is kicking off on Saturday, and organizers are inviting anyone and everyone to pop by, check out what’s going on, pick up …

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Can You Do the Cancan, Kate?

During the 1890s, the United States was a melting pot of entertainment – and vaudeville became the perfect vehicle to showcase this wealth of diversity. From New York to Victoria, B.C., vaudeville reigned supreme as the most popular entertainment in every city and many small towns. The key to vaudeville’s success was that it allowed …

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High on Life

Between the years of 1991 and 2011 my husband and I used to pack up our son and drive to a mountain summit a few times every winter. They were once our favourite places to be: those white wide-open expanses. An active community of winter lovers is still going to the summits: skiers, snowboarders, snow …

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The Trail of 98 Shows Another Side of Robert W. Service

Though best known for his 15 collections of verse (a term he preferred to poetry in reference to his own work) Robert Service also wrote novels. Between 1909 and 1927, he produced some genre material: adventure, mystery, science fiction and horror. The first of these was The Trail of 98: a Northland Romance, written in his …

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Spotlight on Kids at Vaudeville Camp

School’s out for the summer, which means that summer camp is IN! An exciting new day camp is taking centre-stage this year in Whitehorse – specifically, it is taking the stage at the Frantic Follies Theatre, home to the Frantic Follies vaudeville revue. For almost 50 years, Frantic Follies has been delighting Whitehorse audiences with …

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Celebrating Jack London’s Legacy

One of the stops along Dawson’s 8th Avenue Writers’ Block is Jack London Square, home of a part of Jack London’s Klondike cabin and the Jack London Museum, in a setting modeled after a painting by Jim Robb. This year marks the 100th anniversary of London’s passing and the Klondike Visitors Association is marking the …

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An Enterprising Adventurer

The lure of the Yukon brought many enterprising people north.  Togo Takamatsu was one of them. He was born in Chojumura, Japan on February 10, 1875 and immigrated to Vancouver in 1907. In the spring of 1920 he arrived in Carcross becoming one of 20 Asian people living in the Yukon according to the census. He …

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Flat Feet and Brave Hearts: The Yukon at War

Canada was part of the British Empire, so when war was declared by Great Britain on August 4, 1914, Canada, too, joined the the conflict. There was a tremendous upswing of patriotic fervour. The vast American influx during of the Klondike gold rush had been largely replaced by a more settled British population, eager to …

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History is being re-written

Over the last few months, I have been sharing how I became involved in this queen title and what I have been doing. And while doing more research to better educate myself on the Yukon and its history, I have found some great information that I hope will also interest and educate you! During my …

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You are a Winner

One of the many remarks I got when I was selling queen raffle tickets during Yukon Sourdough Rendezvous (YSR) events was, “I have never won a prize”. My usual reply was, “You are already a winner by purchasing the raffle tickets, because you have made a contribution to the community”. My dear friends, by purchasing …

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The Ultimate Guide to Yukon Sport

John Firth’s massive Yukon Sport: An Illustrated Encyclopedia, published in November 2014 by Sport Yukon, is a heavy book. It must weigh 14 pounds. If you’re brain isn’t strong enough to read all of it, mine wasn’t, you can throw out your old barbells and dumbbells and incorporate it into a new fitness program. Little …

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Dreams and Hopes

The great Klondike Gold Rush brought people to the Yukon in the pursuit of their dreams and hopes. To this day, many individuals continue to come to the Yukon like their predecessors over a hundred years ago. I’m the same; I am here to pursue my dream job and hope for a thriving community. It …

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A Piece of Alaska-Yukon History

On a cold and cloudy February day in 1899 a group of eleven men boarded the City of Seattle, a ship bounded for Skagway, Alaska. Some were former gold miners who had been North before, and could not stay away; others were entrepreneurs and businessmen. In the ship saloon they found themselves telling tales from …

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In Cold Blood

Two southern authors alone on a road trip through the Yukon. Sounds like a good premise for a novel, doesn’t it? On June 4, two Canadian mystery writers, Vicki Delany and Barbara Fradkin, touched down in Whitehorse for a 10-day book tour of the Yukon. It will include several events in the capital, as well …

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African, French and Japanese Groups Showcase Their Culture

They are not always featured in history books, but since the Klondike Gold Rush people of many ethnic backgrounds have called the Yukon home. On Sunday, June 23 the Adäka Cultural Festival will host the Sharing Our Spirit Community Celebration, a day of events bringing together the culture of these different groups that have put …

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Make a Date on the Eighth for Authors on Eighth

DAWSON CITY If you’re a writer or a would-be writer and you’re struggling to knuckle down and fill a blank page, why not enter a homegrown Yukon writing contest? If you’re up for the challenge, you have until 4 p.m. on Aug. 8 to enter Dawson City’s Authors on Eighth Writing Competition. It’s true, there’s …

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Contemporary Art Meets History

The storied 53-kilometre Chilkoot Trail crosses the border between Canada and the US and offers spectacular scenery to history buffs and hikers alike. Originally a vital Tlingit trade and travel route, during the Gold Rush it became the “poor man’s route” to the Klondike gold fields. The trail was steep, gold fever was high and …

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See Hank Karr’s Yukon

Hank Karr‘s music is a part of the Yukon landscape. It’s only natural that he would present his music on a DVD, where it can be accompanied by images of the landscape and the Yukon culture that he sings about. Following his DVD, Hank Karr‘s Book of Yukon Memories, Karr has released Long Gone to …

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The Call of the Wild Still Calls!

By the time you read this, Dr. Dirk Rohrbach, from Munich, Germany, should be wrestling with the strong winds on the Yukon River system in his hand-made birch bark canoe. Rohrbach met with churchgoers in Skagway’s Presbyterian Fellowship Hall on Sunday, June 13, before departing on his solo three-month hike and paddle to reach the …

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Things Float Up Magical

Rosemary Scanlon made a digital garden once. And working in Photoshop for hours a day drove her to pick up paintbrush and watercolour again. Through the Looking Glass shows the results at Baked Cafe on Main Street in Whitehorse, along with new images she completed this fall. Scanlon is interested in story-telling images of all …

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They Keep Coming Back

The departure of yet another Berton House writer, Jeanne Randolph, brought to my mind the number of writers in residence who have come and gone – and come again over the last few years. This happens to quite a few people other than writers, and is referred to locally as the Dawson Boomerang Effect. Randolph …

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Strange Things on Film

Braden Brickner’s first job was dishing out popcorn at the Yukon Cinema. Now, the 19-year-old Vanier Catholic Secondary School grad is about to produce his first indie film. With a marquee-filling title lifted straight from the most famous poem Robert Service ever penned, it’s an unusual take on the discovery of gold in the Klondike. …

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Week of a Lifetime

You’ve just stepped off the plane in Whitehorse from your home in the Circumpolar North. You’re excited and proud to represent your region at the Arctic Winter Games (maybe a bit nervous as well), and you’re looking forward to everything the week has to offer. Once you’ve had a chance to strut your stuff at …

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Looking Back: House of Life

The Klondike Gold Rush brought people from all over North America and the world to Dawson City. It should be no surprise then, that among the thousands that poured over the Chilkoot Pass on their way to the City of Gold were representatives of a range of faiths. The variation in churches that sprang up …

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Looking Back: Fickle Fortune

It was inevitable, considering the sheer volume and variety of people who joined the Klondike Gold Rush, that a few people with connections to the occult made it up to Dawson City—psychics were in the crowd. On February 2, 1901, the North-West Mounted Police (NWMP) visited the locales of four practising fortunetellers to alert them …

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Conflicting Concepts of Justice

The discovery of long-buried human remains in Dawson City two years ago shone a public spotlight on a little-known chapter in Yukon history. The four bodies unearthed at the site of a former Northwest Mounted Police palisade turned out to be those of prisoners executed and secretly buried during the Klondike Gold Rush. Two of …

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How Scrooge Made his Fortune

Around this time of year I usually devote a few columns to some of the literary lions that have helped to make Dawson City famous since 1898. This year I’m going to diverge a bit and write about another bit of fiction. It is, perhaps, not known to the general public that the fortune of …

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Beefer Madness

The first thing that comes to mind when you think of the Klondike might not be cattle. But the men who moil for gold need to eat just like the rest of us, and an appetite for beef only grows the longer the carnivorous among us are away from it. The result for the Yukon …

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