It’s a long time before a fashion designer will stage a runway down a catwalk of the snow-laden Millennium Trail, yet the Yukon does uphold a clothing culture. Our style parallels our environment. This leads Yukoners to a distinctive style.

If there were fashion police upholding the laws of Yukon style, any Yukoner without an article of plaid in their closet would be arrested. Somehome the subtle undertones of hearty northerner – meets lumberjack – meets I would actually wear this out in public – all radiate out of the crisscrossing stripes that are plaid.

Furthermore, Yukoners hold supreme immunity to a fashion crime that any other member of the human race would be convicted for: socks with sandals.

Additionally, Yukoners are apt at the art of layering. From long johns to thermo-shirts, from big jackets to light jackets, to wind pants, you might as well receive university credit for calculating how to maintain an ideal body temperature.

Now, winter is upon us and gone are the days of simply walking out the front door. If your house is situated anything like mine, there will be a mud room that looks like a battlefield, strewn with coats, mittens, hats, gloves, boots and thick winter socks. Each morning, you’ll need to dig through each pile of vital winter accessories, against the ticking clock. Arriving at work, most likely missing one glove and hideously over or under-dressed, you’ll vow to reorganize the chaos on a tomorrow that never comes. If you do manage to be part of the lucky few who do get around to actually organizing the mudroom, you’ll then battle the supreme entity of keeping it clean. As over a week of lazily throwing your coat and hat down here or there, the pile will build up once more in its original horrific glory.

Yet there is one item of the entire winter ensemble that never gets lost. It’s the once you’ve wrestled against the needing it and wanting for years as you pass their windows displays. It’s the one where you finally coughed up the cash one Christmas and never looked back. As all Yukoners know, getting clothes for Christmas is worthy of supreme gratitude rather than childish complaints. It’s for when the weather plunges to hit the supreme temperatures, when it’s time to go nuclear. When it’s time to go down.

Now for any Toronto-ians, this supreme temperature is somewhere around 0 degrees Celsius. Yukoners, on the other hand, still uphold the respect for down. They break it out only when deemed absolutely necessary, which is far too late by any southern standards. Yet it is Yukoners who actually live out the Canadian reputation for being able to withstand a chill.

Despite all of the jokes and highlighted ironies, clothing trends follows a culture. And if Yukon culture is embedded in the human roots of keeping warm and keeping comfortable within a cold world, well I couldn’t be prouder to learn the art of Yukon Chic.