Over a dozen Yukon authors published books this year, and from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, December 3, readers can meet seven of them for refreshments and autographs at the annual Mac’s Fireweed Books holiday book bash.

“I’ll have to see where I’m going to put everyone,” jokes manager Lise Schonewille.

In the meantime, complete your gift list with this:

For Children

Jessie says Woof by Ruth McCullough (self-published, under $10.00) is about a Saint Bernard living on the Yukon River. From the opening, “Sometimes, in the Yukon, the sun doesn’t go to bed at night” to the end, McCullough, artist and former arts curator for the Yukon government, illustrates a dog’s life.

For Yukon Buffs

Cinnamon Mine by Ellen Davignon (Harbour Publishing, $18.95) raises delicious memories as Davignon recalls the spice of life growing up at Johnson’s Crossing Lodge on the Alaska Highway. Family photographs enrich this reissue of the 1988 original about a pioneer existence on the Yukon’s first highway.

Talking at the Woodpile by David Thompson (Caitlin Press, $19.95) warms the heart with laughter at the madcap mishaps of the Rock Creek Boys. Thompson’s short stories brim with a wry humour essential to life in the North.

TeLLing TaLes by Karen Keeley (self-published, $14.05) encompasses 20 years of writing experience, both literary and geographic as she wrote, lived and learned her craft from Thunder Bay to Whitehorse.

For Inspiration

Stop Wishing Start Winning by Dean Philpott (TAG Publishing LLC, $19.95) describes how Philpott went from being an average guy, The Bald Guy, to the Yukon’s top realtor, to life coach and motivational speaker.

For Naturalists

Wolves of the Yukon by Bob Hayes (self-published, $27.99) blends fact and fiction to present two decades of wolf science conducted during his career as Yukon wolf biologist.

YUKON a wilder place by Fritz Mueller and Theresa Earle (Greystone Books, $50.00) confirms, with photo essays on light, pattern, flow, and systems, that the Yukon is indeed a wilder place. Harsh, beautiful and lush.

For Poets, Women, Adventurers and More

Although the authors aren’t on hand for signing, browse around for these Yukon titles:

Kerosene by Jamella Hagen (Nightwood Editions, $18.95) juxtaposes life in the bush and the city through Hagen’s experience. Whitehorse Poetry Festival-goers and guests suggest you turn up the wick for Kerosene.

Remarkable Yukon Women by Claire Festel and Valerie Hodgson (Harbour Publishing, $29.95) features 50 Portraits and 50 Profiles of 50 women over 50. “At that age, every woman has a story to tell,” says writer Claire Festel. “This is a celebration of the ties that link us.”

Yukon Arctic Ultra by Mark Hines (Healthy Body Publishing, $30.95) recounts the journey of the U.K. ultra athlete and London School of Medicine physiologist on the 2007 Yukon Arctic Ultra. Says one fan, “The combination of witty (and occasionally half-witty?) asides, solid technical details, and in-depth introspection show what is needed to get through such an amazing event.”

As well, look through the lens of Haines Junction photographer Brigitte Geske in Kluane Magic, or write your own story with Elayne Hurlburt’s journal, The Garden Says Create.