Jerome Stueart

What's Up Yukon Columnist Jerome Stueart has a BA in Theatre, writes fiction and enjoys seeing a good play.

Walks into her life, tips hat, sweeps her off to the Yukon

Vanessa takes me to the Millennium Trail on a sunny afternoon. We smell the heavy aroma of flowers, somewhere, and find the top of a tree covered in buzzing insects and butterflies. A small yellow bird darts through the branches. It’s her favourite place to walk now. “I try to come here daily, and when …

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More than a devotional (book is insight into community)

Northern Reflections, Desmond Carroll, paintings by Ted Harrison, The cover of Northern Reflections shows an inukshuk and a blazing sun over ice. One of Ted Harrison’s favourite paintings, it was also selected by Marion Carroll, the wife of the late author, Desmond Carroll. She had reason to choose that cover. “It’s about guidance. Inukshuks were …

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They chose Whitehorse first

I’m sitting on a rock where Lil’s Place will be in about 14,000 years. I’m thinking about a chocolate shake, but chocolate hasn’t really been invented yet. I’m travelling with some people who have finally made it to the Whitehorse area — where they will stay for a few years. “Oh, maybe 10 years,” Om …

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No one can shock with such delight

In 1962, it was shocking and titillating. Though the Pulitzer Prize committee handed it a Pulitzer, it was revoked for language, for sexual situations. When it ran an England tour, Lord Chamberlain made the playwright, Edward Albee, change the swear words, “Jesus Christ” to “Cheese God.” Half sarcastically, Albee asked, “What about saying Mary M. …

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Vigils bring people together

In Philadelphia to attend a science-fiction convention, I received an email telling me that a young gay teen, Jorge Lopez Mercado had been dismembered, partially burned and decapitated in Puerto Rico. It was also only three weeks after American President Obama signed the Matthew Shepard Act, the new Hate Crimes Legislation. The man charged with …

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Walker’s Laramie Project shows the triumph of community

Clinton Walker, the director brought up from Toronto for The Laramie Project, has made me chili. Little triangles of toasted bread sit next to the bowl. Walker is staying at the Almost Home Bed and Breakfast, a cute B&B in Valleyview. He’s been here for six weeks now. In some ways, Whitehorse has become another …

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Nina Arsenault talks about the pursuit of beauty and truth

Nina Arsenault warns me that she’s not about to tell the “typical” transsexual story to Nakai Theatre’s Pivot Festival audiences. You know the story, she says, “Her name is Barbara, she used to be Markus, she never felt right in her own body, she met a doctor and now she’s getting boobs. It’s the same …

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The 3rd annual Pivot Festival: Floating, swimming, flying

The Pivot Festival is upon us — and with it comes a huge ton of theatre. You have six shows you can see at multiple times, all wildly different, appealing to both broad and specific audiences. It’s like a carnival of mad, wonderful theatre taking over the town for a week. Feeling a bit like …

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The Trickster as Bingo Master

Can one Holy Grail of a Bingo Game in Toronto be the answer to the dreams of seven women living on a reserve? Tomson Highway’s play, The Rez Sisters, asks that question as it sends seven women on a journey to seek out the Bingo Game to beat all Bingo Games. Gwaandak Theatre reads the …

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River Walk Columns appear out of nowhere overnight

How many times had I passed by the columns without seeing them? Joyce Majiski swears she put the columns up two years ago, and yet, as if I’ve just been given x-ray glasses, this is the first time I’ve noticed them. Five columns of various earth-tone colours, with metal rings girding their middles and metal …

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Wicked wits of the west spar in Irish black comedy

There are two prizefighters in this ring. And they’ve been going round and round trading off the mantles of victor and victim for too many years. You have a sense that there is nothing left in their relationship but the fight. The Beauty Queen of Leenane, the award-winning play by Martin McDonagh, challenges an audience …

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Laramie Project delivers stunning ensemble work

I gave Justine Davidson, the theatre reviewer for the Whitehorse Star, a long hug at the end of The Laramie Project, the Guild Society/GALA play. Both of us were near tears. She said over my shoulder, “Does this mean it’s good when the journalists are crying?” We weren’t the only ones moved. But don’t let …

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Stories you’ve never heard, brilliantly told

I went Saturday night to The River, a Nakai production, with Michael Greyeyes directing a play written by David Skelton, Judith Rudakoff and Joseph Tisiga. To be frank, I wasn’t sure if I was interested in what I thought would be a sermon on homelessness. I just didn’t want the guilt. But local playwright David …

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We wanted a community we could call our own

“We were in Pakistan — as ever, saving children,” Martin Crill says at the Baked Café, where the sun has finally come inside. “We believed Canada had forgotten about us.” He worked for Save the Children UK, an independent children’s charity, often intervening in war situations to help displaced children find families. Martin’s Canadian journey …

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