On the banks of Kwanlin, Raven lounged.

“Oh, I am so weary after

Making the world

Stealing the light

Killing the Whale

Creating the Bear.

I would like to see my little cousins

But it is too far

For a tired old raven like me.”

On the banks of Kwanlin, Raven looked up.

“Oh, what was that shadow

Covering the world

Stealing my light

Bigger than Whale

Creating that noise?

I would like to follow that bird.

It is not too far

For a tired old raven like me.”

At the Whitehorse Airport, Raven approached.

“Oh, you are Condor!

Traveling the world

Chasing the light

Bigger than Eagle

Stronger than Bear.

I would like to see my little cousins.

It is too far to fly

For a tired old raven like me.”

At the Whitehorse Airport, Raven reflected.

“Oh, I’ve tried to ride Eagle

Over the world

Chasing his back

Grumpy that Eagle

Stronger than Raven.

I would like to ride in your belly

If Condor would do that

For a tired old raven like me.”

From the Whitehorse Airport, Condor flew north.

“Oh, there goes the Yukon

Top of the World

Chasing the wind

Faster than Eagle

Stronger than gravity.

I would like to see it all.

The trip of a lifetime

For a tired old raven like me!”

At the airport in Frankfurt, Raven cleared customs.

“Oh, look at my cousins!

Crows of the Rhine

Riding the wind

Bolder than Eagle

Flirting with gravity.

I would like to have them all

Come to Kwanlin and visit

A happy old raven like me.”


About this Poem (Poem Identity):

“Raven Meets Condor” is an un-metered, non-rhyming narrative.  While the poem might appear unstructured in the conventional sense, the stanzas follow a strictly structured pattern as follows:

1st line: Location followed by Raven/Condor verb

2nd line: “Oh!” followed by a declaration

3rd to 6th lines: Each line contains at least one word from the matching line in the preceding stanza.

7th line: “I would like to” followed by a declaration

8th line: “For a tired old raven like me.” (With the exception of the final verse.)

The poem is intended to evoke First Nation’s narrative legends, where animals can assume human forms and vice versa, with a touch of contemporary whimsy.