British Columbia

From the Punjab to the Yukon

Gurdeep Pandher was one of the first people I met when I moved to the Yukon. I walked into a Scottish country barn dance at the Old Fire Hall, in Whitehorse, and here was a guy in the remote North in his pagri, at an event, sitting and absorbing the dances and people.

Bear Mountain – A redux

If you’ve read about our first attempt to climb (or even glimpse) Bear Mountain, you may be wondering how or why we ever returned. I wish I knew myself, with any sort of confidence. Was it the resentment of failure? Was it the undeterrable enthusiasm we had for this climb? Was it because of a …

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Remembering (and never repeating) history

The Japanese Canadian Association of Yukon (JCAY) will be hosting events this November in recognition of the 30th anniversary of the success of the Redress campaign in 1988. Fumi Torigai, former president of JACY, for 9 years, now community-relations advisor, explains that, in 1942, after the attack on Pearl Harbour, Canada joined World War II. …

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Bear Mountain: A loving tribute to a living nightmare – Part 2

Things started off great when we immediately got off trail (we wouldn’t know this till days later). We attempted to follow some GPS tracks I plucked from the internet. This involved scaling a wet, lushly vegetated and slippery mountainside. This became increasingly tiresome and ludicrous, with steep precipice falls a constant reminder of our mortality. …

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Bear Mountain – A loving tribute to a living nightmare

In the late summer of 2016, my friend Dan and I attempted to climb Bear Mountain, a 2,400-metre tall peak situated in the North Cascades National Park, just south of British Columbia. The north buttress of this mountain offers 670 metres of superb alpine granite. Tucked away in northern Washington, the base of the climb …

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Advice to the unwise: I have the questions, if you have the answers

One of the more interesting jobs I’ve ever held was hosting an open-line show (we secretly called it “open-mouth”) on a private radio station in Charlottetown, PEI. Unlike some parts of Canada—especially B.C., with its tradition of brash (often infuriating) talk-radio hosts such as Jack Webster, Raif Mair, Christy Clark and others, mid-’70s PEI was …

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