Issue: 2022 August 31

August 31st 2022.

Serena Rider & The Strombellas help the Yukon Arts Centre celebrate a milestone.

 

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Unearthing a ‘miracle’

Nun cho ga is a near complete mummified female mammoth calf. This piece of Yukon history was found by placer miners working at Eureka Creek

fish strew and ingredients

The Unexpected Joys of Fishing

I never thought that I would like fishing. In fact, as with many things our minds convince us of, I went through the better part of my life certain that I was very happy having nothing to do with piscine pursuits. I didn’t particularly like eating fish and I felt no need to try to catch one. And then I fell in love with a man who loves fishing.

two black labs sitting

Puppy Mayhem, Puppy Love

About 18 months ago, my husband and I were having a peaceful morning coffee together, chatting about various household issues. Our then eight-year-old black Lab (Sula) was asleep on one end of the sofa—her preferred napping spot. Suddenly my husband said, “If I die before you and you are left on your own, would you like to have a dog for company? I know that I would.” When I said “Yes” (tentatively), he immediately embarked on a search to find a black Lab puppy whose life would overlap with Sula’s.

Stewed Okra Rice

Okra is gooey (just accept that gooey is a nice quality and embrace it). This rice dish stews okra and rice, with bacon, and uses the goo to make a rich filling side that would go well with braised meats and any sort of spicy barbecue sauce.

Dining In The Dark

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to eat … without being able to see? Well, you can experience eating at a restaurant without being able to see! Yes, that’s right, your only senses would be touch, smell, taste and hearing.

A Bird With Many Names

If you have been camping this year, was your picnic table visited by a Gray Jay, a Canada Jay, a Whiskeyjack or a Camp Robber? The answer is almost certainly, yes.

A watermelon

The Durable (Water)Melon

The origin of watermelons date back as far as 5,000 years ago, in the deserts of South Africa. This melon had the ability to grow in drought-ridden conditions and to store water within the fruit; hence the name watermelon. It was a great food source for some ancient African tribes to have as they ventured across deserts. However, the taste was much more on the bitter side. Around 2000 BCE, the watermelon also made appearances in the burial chambers of ancient Egyptian royalty. In some of the hieroglyphics written on the walls of the burial chambers, the watermelon is depicted.

A mother and child smiling into the camera

Toddler-Friendly Skies

The time had come. We had waited two years to be able to introduce our toddler to his extended family and now, at last, it was finally going to happen. However, in order to do that we first had to become the parents I have always looked at with a mix of trepidation and sympathy. We had to become FWAT parents. You know the ones: the “flying with a toddler” parents.

Keep the Humanity in the Work

In a world where there is now a mix of work environments, here are some tips for working from home — for employees and employers (and family)

ADHD & The Great Outdoors

The move a southeastern Ontario city to small & isolated Old Crow, Yukon had an unexpected positive change on my ADHD and mental health.

A woman sitting on a bed of pine cones

Coming Back To The Yukon (Part 2)

“I cannot cross the river,” I told my friends as they were about to move on. (The truth was I didn’t want to cross the river.) We were a group of seven people hiking … two of us were staying behind on the beautiful sandy beach at Kusawa Lake, as the others went farther. I felt like sitting back and relaxing. My other friend was feeling the same. We are queens, we said. We don’t like to cross rivers.

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