Remembrance Day

The Yukon Remembers

The Remembrance Day ceremony at the Canada Games Centre (CGC) is something many community members have missed, over the past couple of years.

The quilt of many poppies

Joseph Novak is a World War ll veteran and possibly the last in the Yukon who served overseas. Joe moved into Whistle Bend Place early this year and has delighted co-residents and staff with his passionate storytelling, unshakable love of music and gratitude for life. In October of last year, Joe was given a 7×7-foot …

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Lest we forget

The poppy was originally worn by Americans. Madame Guerin convinced Canadian veterans to adopt the poppy in Canada.

Lest we forget

Each year we hope you take the time to remember on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, wherever we are. In the modern world and as we become more disconnected from the memories of what occurred, it becomes more important that we share the necessity of recalling what may occur …

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We will remember them

It’s important to reflect each November 11th and remember those young men and women who gave their lives on behalf of their country.

Honouring and remembering sacrifice

The Battle of Vimy Ridge was a great victory for Canada, but it came at a price. In this battle, there were more than 10,500 casualties and about 3,600 killed. To our knowledge, Herbert Lawless was the only known Yukoner to fall in this battle.

Rope wreaths and Yukon steamers

Ruth Treskatis, volunteer and Janna Swales, executive director, proudly display their creations in front of the popsicle stick model of the SS Klondike at the Yukon Transportation Museum on Oct 15/18 What a history-packed day November 3, 2018, will be at our local Yukon Transportation Museum (YTM). The special activities start at 3 p.m. with …

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Lest we forget

Remembrance Day is now as much an opportunity to recognize all those men and women who have served and returned home. We owe them thanks. That’s why we wear our poppies and hold our ceremonies, to support and remember.

Filling the Gaps in Our History

“Everyone talks about the Goldrush. I’m interested in the gaps in history. The points in between,” says Yukon writer Michael Gates, author of From the Klondike to Berlin. Published last month, this book is, perhaps surprisingly, the first to offer an in depth account of the Yukon’s contribution to World War I. Gates says that …

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Remembering Japanese Canadian Soldiers of WWI

Remembrance Day has taken more meaning for me lately.  Recently Yukon Archives shared some information about some Japanese from Dawson City who served in the First World War. This was a complete surprise to me. I wondered, Why would they serve? The Dawson Daily News of June 21, 1918 reported that there were five Japanese …

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Surviving a Grizzly Attack and the Great War

Jim Christie was born in Scotland in 1867. He emigrated to Manitoba and then came to the Klondike in 1898. The short, wiry Scotsman took to living in the north like a duck to water. He prospected in the summers and trapped in the winters, learning everything about the isolated regions of the northland. He …

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Joe Boyle: The Klondike King Who Became a War Hero

Joe Boyle came to the Klondike with the first wave of gold-seekers in the early summer of 1897, but soon left with a dream of becoming rich. He was successful in obtaining a large mining concession in the Klondike Valley from the federal government in 1909, and within a decade had gained control of one …

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Flat Feet and Brave Hearts: The Yukon at War

Canada was part of the British Empire, so when war was declared by Great Britain on August 4, 1914, Canada, too, joined the the conflict. There was a tremendous upswing of patriotic fervour. The vast American influx during of the Klondike gold rush had been largely replaced by a more settled British population, eager to …

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A Day to Remember

The first time you read this might be on Remembrance Day, November 11, a day which has a lot more significance now than it did before our troops began operations in Afghanistan in late 2001. The day is a little confusing in its national application because, while it is a holiday here in the Yukon …

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Looking Back: The most interesting man in the world

Every now and then, a figure emerges out of the shadows of history with so much success and so many adventures that you swear they must be made up. Without the historical record and extensive documentation, we might swear it is impossible for these people to exist. (After all, there’s only so much a person …

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The Best Remembrance

There is service at the battlefront, a Calling to be sure, though not for God and Glory, that old lie from days of yore. Those who served and did their best, they have no fear of shame; it is those who failed to stem the tide of war who own the blame. We others, though …

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