Summer

A watermelon

The Durable (Water)Melon

The origin of watermelons date back as far as 5,000 years ago, in the deserts of South Africa. This melon had the ability to grow in drought-ridden conditions and to store water within the fruit; hence the name watermelon. It was a great food source for some ancient African tribes to have as they ventured across deserts. However, the taste was much more on the bitter side. Around 2000 BCE, the watermelon also made appearances in the burial chambers of ancient Egyptian royalty. In some of the hieroglyphics written on the walls of the burial chambers, the watermelon is depicted.

Navigating Dawson’s streets last summer

We are in the third season of a mammoth upgrade project to deal with the deficiencies in the town’s sewer and water infrastructure. That has meant that getting around town has been interesting enough for those of us who live here. For visitors, it’s probably been a mite of a mystery.

How was Your Summer?

How was your summer?  That seems to be the question Yukoners ask each other at this time of year. Along with recounting various adventures, most of us give our summery (pun intended) of the weather. We often talk about the summer being hot or cold, dry or wet, but we are actually talking about a …

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Yukon See It Here: Shannon Wyers

Hello Everybody, We invite you to share your photos of Yukon life. Email your high-resolution images with a description of what’s going on to [email protected]n.com. I worked a night shift on July 3. I got to see the sunset and sunrise.

Yukon Ski Patrol

The Canadian Ski Patrol is a national organization is composed of more than 5,000 volunteers from coast to coast, in Canada, in 59 zones and nine divisions. The Yukon Ski Patrol is part of that non-profit organization providing a variety of services (not just ski patrol) year-round. What does a ski patroller do? The Yukon …

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Yukon See It Here – By Matt Cook

I took these photos while out kayaking on Fox Lake and enjoyed a beautiful sunset from the middle of the lake.

Yukon See It Here: Shawn Pollard

I took these with a drone on a hike into the Samuel Glacier last weekend, this hike is off the Haines Road.

Kathleen & Kokanee in Kluane – Part 3 of 6

Kathleen Lake, which is the only place in Kluane National Park you can sleep (legally) if you have rubber wheels for your mode of transportation (rather than flying machines, skis, hiking boots or birchbark).

A Kenai kickoff to a new series – Part 1 of 6

Homer, on the west side of the Kenai Peninsula, is the farthest south you can drive and became my favourite place to RV camp in Alaska because of this surprise: it felt like California.

A new home for GoNorth Whitehorse

by Yvonne Freiderich GoNorth expands its car & RV rental business with RV service, repair and storage at its new location on Mt. Sima Road “Summertime is RV time—for locals and tourists alike! Whether you want to rent an RV or you need your own unit repaired, GoNorth is proud to serve you,” said the …

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Low impact on the land

The sites you choose look good to you or you wouldn’t set up there. Make your best effort to leave them as you found them. PHOTO: Pixabay   It really wasn’t too many years ago that campsites could be obvious almost forever due to the accepted practices of the day. Tents were different with straight …

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The green bags of spring

It’s the nature of short Yukon summers for Yukoners to seize every moment and they perhaps forget about things like contributions to the food bank.

A Memorable Night in a Red Caboose in the Forest

Choo-choo-choosing to camp in an old red caboose in the middle of the largest national forest in the United States was certainly very wet, but an experience I won’t forget. During a visit to Skagway over the May long weekend, I had taken the White Pass and Yukon Route train to the White Pass summit. …

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The Week that Was…

Once summer arrived, along with consistent plus 25 temperatures, it was time to enjoy some swimming, hiking and generally the beautiful weather in Yukon. (In the Yukon, if you see a single day of plus 20, there is a likelihood it will come to fruition, but a few days showing the same, you’re guaranteed good …

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Third Time’s the Charm

My friend, Lucy (not her real name – she asked me to call her that), is no stranger to adventure. The daring Ontario expat, who has called the Yukon home for the last decade, has twice answered the call to cycle the Dempster Highway – a rugged expanse of terrain stretching from Dawson City to …

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Slap on a Hat, Slip into this Book

Every summer, Rose and her family pack up and head to their cottage in Awago Beach. There, the long days melt into lake swims and beach fires, counting stars, five-cent candies, watching movies and running around with her summer-sister, Windy. It’s summertime, and the living is easy, right? But this year something feels off. In …

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Hiking Miles Canyon to Canyon City: A Landscape with a Past

One of the most visited attractions in Whitehorse, the Miles Canyon Suspension Bridge, is a great launching point for interesting half-day hikes. Located about 10 minutes from downtown by road, the historic 95-year-old suspension bridge (which has been recently repaired) is connected to a well-established network of trails east of the Yukon River, in Chadburn …

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Hiking the Same Ol’ Trail

I never understood how people love to go camping at the same spot year after year, or walk the same trail over and over, canoe the same river, or go to the same mall. I realize now that we all have different goals. I myself have a strong desire to explore. And finally, I am …

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Visiting Fort Selkirk

As someone who has always been very interested in Yukon history the Fort Selkirk Historic Site was definitely on the list of places we wanted the visit during the year we lived in the Yukon. But how to get there since there is no road access? Located near the confluence of the Yukon and the …

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How Long Can You HIIT?

Want to do something this summer that you can brag to all your friends about? Its free, requires a small space and will improve your overall health. Welcome to your new summer activity called High Intensity Interval Training – otherwise known as HIIT. The technique is inspired by the principles of German coach Woldemar Gerschler …

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Fishnets and Chainsaws

From antique carousel and ferris wheel rides, to wearable art and cake bake off contests, to beer and wine gardens, to beach wrestling and the Fisherman’s Rodeo, the Southeast Alaska State Fair really does have something for everyone. The longstanding annual festival, which takes over the 25-acre fairgrounds in the small town of Haines, Alaska, …

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The Week That Was…

The week began with my English friend finally making it with her CanaDream Camper – a one-month, one-woman journey from Calgary to Whitehorse. For the special occasion , to celebrate her arrival, we decided to head to Takhini Hot Springs; my first time. The boiling hot water is pleasant and it’s a pretty quiet Wednesday …

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Dawson City Music Festival Amps up for its 39th Year

It may be the 39th year of Dawson City’s beloved annual music festival, but this tried-and-true summer favourite is always sure to include some firsts. This is definitely the case for East Coaster Andrea Vincent, who took over as Dawson City Music Festival Executive Director last August. Though she has been involved in organizing music …

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An Epic Weekend of Hiking

The saying in Yukon is you only truly experience the Yukon when you get out in the wilderness, and those words are accurate beyond belief. From incredible hikes, to a free boat ride, to some refreshing beers and a Sunday afternoon Canadian barbecue… it was a busy, but great weekend! After a month in Whitehorse, …

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Those Were the Days. They Still Are

The emptying-out of Yukon’s schools signals the official start of that much-anticipated annual ritual: the Summer Holiday. We all know the narrative arc of that story. For the first little while, the kids are bursting to be outside every moment of the day, burning off the pent-up energy held hostage inside the classroom for months. …

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A Quarter Century of Fusing Delicious Food and Great Music

It’s a summer Friday night in Haines Junction, and almost anybody who loves good food, good music and the spectacular St. Elias Mountains knows right where they’d like to be. As the dinner hour draws near, so do the patrons of the Village Bakery and Deli, tucked into a tree-lined corner just a stone’s throw …

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Bear Spray

It’s that time of the year again, the bears are out and we need a refresher on bear spray. It isn’t magic – and definitely not the solution to all bear problems – but with a little know-how it will keep you safe in most bear encounter situations. Bear spray is a tool to help …

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The Entrepreneurs of Tomorrow

With summer approaching quickly, parents are faced with a familiar question: Where do I want my kids to spend their days while I am at work? This can sometimes be a stressful decision for parents, with so many diverse options for camps and childcare, there is no shortage of possibilities. However, a new camp starting …

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Wicked Fit

Ryan MacGillivray has been sheep hunting for 10 years. Three years ago, he had the idea to start a boot camp for sheep hunters. He did this because he knew the participants in the camp would push him to train harder for the sheep hunting season. “Well, I wanted people to work out with,” he …

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Taking on Sunshine Crack

I sleep in the next morning and Dan and I take it slow. Ironically named, Sunshine Crack faces north and does not catch sun until late in the day. It is cold in the Bugaboos, despite it being late July. Our approach is easy however and we are at the base by 11 a.m. There …

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Taking the Kain Route

We begin the next day by eating cereal with rehydrated milk powder, gathering our things and setting out. The hike and scramble to the base of the climb involves navigating past several glacier pools, ascending a snow ramp in crampons, and scrambling up a loose low-angle rock slab. Upon reaching the saddle between Bugaboo Spire …

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Bugaboos, Part 1

Due to the geographical layout of the valley we ascend, Anniversary Peak and Hound’s Tooth remain in view for most of the way while all other peaks are generally obscured by trees and hills. The hike takes us three hours, with few breaks, and spits us out onto an incredible plateau of rock, overlooking the …

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K – Come See Why People Line Up

Klondike Rib & Salmon is only open in the summer. Both tourists and locals alike flocking to the restaurant. It’s a welcoming place, from the steps up onto the cozy front deck and its patio tables, through the entrance foyer to the dining room, which was originally opened as a tent frame bakery, called MacMillan’s …

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Spotlight on Kids at Vaudeville Camp

School’s out for the summer, which means that summer camp is IN! An exciting new day camp is taking centre-stage this year in Whitehorse – specifically, it is taking the stage at the Frantic Follies Theatre, home to the Frantic Follies vaudeville revue. For almost 50 years, Frantic Follies has been delighting Whitehorse audiences with …

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The Strange Story of Mary Hanulik Garden

Dawson City blooms in the summer. It’s a process that begins in some local commercial greenhouses and explodes after the horticultural booths at the Gold Show during Victoria Day Weekend in May. It then continues unabated as part of the Farmers’ Market during the summer, and employs several landscaping and gardening firms during the same …

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The Joys of Reading Aloud

Jack London’s The Call of the Wild is not a particularly long book. A mere 70 pages, perhaps a few more in a version with illustrations, it is often published between the same covers as its thematic opposite, White Fang, often along with some of the better known short stories to round out the page …

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Camaraderie in a Canoe

Nine ladies in a voyageur canoe whose ages range from 23 to 62; 715 kilometres; paddling for Yukon Cancer Care Fund. Stix Together is a team of Whitehorse women participating in the 18th Annual Yukon River Quest. The race begins with a mass start at noon on Wednesday, June 29. Participants gather at the gazebo …

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Summer Fun has Begun

Look around. The birds are singing, canoes and kayaks are back on Subaru roof racks and my neighbour seems to have an urge for gardening at 11:30 p.m. These are signs of summer. It’s a change from spending much of our time inside, sipping hot tea and feeding the woodstove to living the wild and …

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Family Camping

My daughter’s dad and I started taking our daughters for Dempster Highway camping adventures around 1991, and the magic and fun times of those trips stayed with them,  helping them to become independent and adventurous souls. Here is an excerpt from my daughter Rachel’s 2001 essay, called “True Tracks,” that shows the kind of fun …

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The Gold Sisters

Making Plans for the Midnight Sun

Rumour has it the 2015 lineup is the Kluane Bluegrass Music Festival’s best yet. No shortage of interest in headlining 2 decades in.

Berry Picking in Old Crow

In the past two years the herd of Porcupine Caribou in Old Crow herd has gradually changed its natural migration route.

Talk Daddy To Me

I arrive in Ontario on a Monday at 1 a.m. It’s late on a work night and the airport is an hour’s drive from home, but my father is here to pick me up, having made it clear when I booked the flight it was no problem for him. It’s the cheapest option that gets …

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Winter Is Not Coming

I’ve been online shopping. Specifically, I’ve been fixated on merino wool base layers on Amazon. Researching sizes, the best weave weight, which tops will work both as under and outer wear, what brands won’t pill. I’ve found some that are half price! With free shipping! And in the seven days since I’ve been home I’ve …

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Ramble in T.O.

  My dance practice is rooted in uncultivated, wild, outdoor spaces. I often perform site-specific dances outdoors for audiences and/or camera. However, my latest collaborative project, Ramble (45 min), was performed last month inside a black box theatre in a busy city (Toronto), within a busy theatre and dance festival (the 25th edition of SummerWorks). …

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A Northern Diary

Carolyn Vincent taught in the Yukon in the 1970s and also cooked for an outfitter for a few months in 1976. She typed out a diary of what her life was like during that time. We are reprinting it here with minimal editorial tampering. Last time we left her, hunting season was just starting. Here …

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No Exit

It’s mid-winter when I finalize the tentative plans I’ve carried with me since leaving Ontario to drive to the Yukon a year ago. This summer I will leave again: the myth of an uncle I’ve never met pulls me to New Mexico. I’ll slip down the West coast, visiting friends as I go, then cross …

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Going for the Beat

As the famous Alice Cooper song says, “School’s ouuuuuut for the summer!”  But for kids of various ages whose passion is music, classes are set to resume next Monday, when the Yukon Summer Music Camp begins. The week-long annual event offers instruction in a wide range of musical forms and styles, for students of varying …

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Bitter Lessons and Sweet Memories

Gin is the quintessential summer spirit, especially for those of us who live above the 49th parallel. Rum, tequila, and bourbon more properly belong to the south, evoking sea and sand and dreamy afternoons under the liveoak tree. Gin, however, was invented in the Northern Hemisphere, first appearing in Holland in the 17th Century and …

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kiteboarder

Carcross: Hiking, biking and … Kiteboarding

Carcross has always been known for hiking. Lately, with Montana Mountain right next door, it has become a favoured destination for biking, too. Now, word is filtering out to the world that Lake Bennett is offering up some world-class opportunities for kiting. You’ve seen it before: whenever a soft-drink company wants a commercial to show …

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Panning for glory

Yukon’s mining heritage will be celebrated this summer in Dawson City. On July 4, from 1 to 4 p.m., the Yukon Gold Panning Championships will take place at the Waterfront Park on Front Street, offering several levels of competition open to all ages and skills. The Klondike Visitors Association (KVA) puts on the event. Katie …

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Soup Season?

Well I hope that sundrenched stretch wasn’t summer. It was glorious, hot, and beautiful — what a tease. I’m sitting inside with the rain lashing the windows under our first precipitation since Environment Canada’s icons changed from snowflakes to water-drops; I actually lit a fire today to ward off the chill and damp. Nothing outside …

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The Tip of the Iceberg

Like those who attended the first Sex Pistols concert, I too like to take credit for discovering something revolutionary: the iceberg. In 1996, I attended Grade 9 at the now-defunct Christ the King Junior Secondary on Nisutlin Drive in Riverdale. As the days of spring took hold, it was not uncommon for me to walk …

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Seed Catalogues Launch Dreams

“There are two seasonal diversions that can ease the bite of any winter. One is the January thaw. The other is the seed catalogues” – Hal Borland, American journalist (1900 – 1978). Seed catalogues evoke memories of summer breezes and warmer times; they are wonderful to peruse on a cold blustery day. We often receive three, …

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Don’s Famous Peaches

Famous Peaches SUBHEAD: A breakfast fit for the fit by Don Graham I normally buy two cases of Canadian grown peaches to last me one winter. They generally cost anywhere from $18 to $27 per case. My preferred variety is freestone peaches, where the pit is easy to remove. I store them in the basement …

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The Soul is Back in Dawson City

For those who like to boogey down, Miles from Motown, formerly the Soul Sunday Band, is back in Dawson to make it happen. Every Sunday night during the summer at the Westminster hotel, Fred Osson, Jennifer Migliorini, Wray Auger, Richard Halliday and Drew Davies take to the stage and bring a little funk into everyone’s …

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Summer Insomnia

Most of us attribute summer fatigue to long days, late nights and too much to do. For some people, though, summer insomnia is more complicated and serious than that. Without proper rest, we cannot be sufficiently restored and recuperated. Our bodies become vulnerable, our minds go dull, and our spirits wither. It is no way …

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Give and Take

I feel a bit like Gollum. I am squatting on my haunches, slurping delicious juices from my fingers as I delight in a fresh pike. Perhaps muttering to myself a little. Except I’m picking out the bones, whereas Gollum relished them with a crunch. And my fish is piping hot — J.R.R. Tolkien’s pity-worthy character …

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The Next Big Find

“Garage sale-ing” describes the act of heading out on a Saturday morning, coffee and local classifieds in hand, to find the next steal-of-a-deal.  The feeling aroused by discovering said deal(s) is a cheap thrill that brings many in the territory out on a weekly basis during the summer. I am not alone when I say …

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4-H is in Full Swing

Whitehorse Spirit Riders 4-H club kicked off a summer riding season with a three-day riding clinic at the North Ridge Indoor Riding Arena. The focus of the clinic was fundamental riding levels and team building. The riders were fortunate to have Jody Mackenzie-Grieve as their local clinician. Jody has years of riding under belt and …

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Shades of Summer

A few days ago I met Cam Webber for an after-work drink at the Roadhouse. Cam is a gravedigger for the City of Whitehorse, and had already set up camp with a couple of colleagues under a patio umbrella when I traipsed in. The sun shone down uninhibited by clouds, warming both our bodies and …

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Learning Beyond School: Braeburn Lake Summer Camp offers community, leadership and fun

Summer camp offers a lot to young people that classrooms don’t — canoeing, crafts, campfires, and no homework.  However, what sticks out the most for kids are the relationships formed with the people at camp.  A five-day summer camp can lead to a new level of friendship and community. After eating every meal together, sleeping …

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Fly Fishing for Pike

In the Yukon, fly anglers usually target arctic grayling, rainbow trout, or kokanee salmon in stocked lakes. These fish are readily available, fairly easy to catch and make great meals. One very common Yukon fish, usually overlooked by the fly-angler, is the northern pike. These great fish are often demeaned with nicknames like “slough shark” or “alligator,” and sadly …

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Yukon Harvest Time

I can’t believe it’s almost over. This summer was one of the best on record as far as gardening goes. We always had lots of produce to harvest and a sell at the markets. But the garden doesn’t stop producing just because the Fireweed Community Market is done for the season. In fact, there are …

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Beer and Sport

It doesn’t have to be an epic battle between the forces of good and evil. I believe beer can live in a symbiotic relationship with athletic pursuits. It’s all about balance, expectations, pacing and choosing your sport wisely. The expats in Malay had it right — drinkers with a running problem. The Hash House Harriers …

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No Judgement. Really.

I’m not going to tell you what you should drink. I don’t care if you ferment raisins with brewers yeast in a garbage pail. I’m a laissez-faire kind of person. You can drink your Bud Light Lime, your Wildcat or your Pabst Blue Ribbon. You don’t have to be sheepish. Why would I care? Most …

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Global Warming Affects Beer Production … OK, Now It’s Serious

Just the other day while I watching the store here at the Yukon Brewing Company, I had a customer look outside our windows while I was filling his growler and remark that maybe we have global warming wrong. I finished filling his jug and turned around to see a mid-April blizzard swirling around our parking …

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Getting Your Greenhouse In Order

At this point in the season, maintenance is the goal for keeping your greenhouse productive now and in the coming month. Despite the snow at the beginning of June, the plants in your greenhouse should be growing rapidly. I would recommend keeping an eye on the following potential trouble spots: air circulation and fungal problems. …

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Plants Helping Plants

One of the more interesting characteristics of plants is that plants are affected chemically by the aroma from leaves, roots and by soil micro-organisms. Knowing which plants like each other and which don’t, and planting these together, is what is known as companion planting. Companion planting is the planting of different crops in close proximity …

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Tomatoes: The Needs of the Many Outweigh the Needs of the Few

One sunny August afternoon, I walked into our “Tomato” greenhouse only to find my husband, Frank, yielding a machete (OK, a large knife) chopping off the tops of all the tomato plants. Positive that the heat finally got to him and he’s gone berserk, I yelled: “What the heck are you doing?” The long rows …

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Salvaging a Short Growing Season

It’s been obvious to gardeners for some time that this summer has not been favourable for vegetable gardening. The lack of sunny days combined with cool nights is just not the best for ripening of tomatoes. Outdoor vegetables such as cabbage and cauliflower are also very late in forming heads. The hope for these crops …

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Simple Salad for People on the Go

Here is a simple salad, colourful and high in nutrients. Try using a whole wheat penne or vegetable pasta for interesting texture and increased fibre. Bright-red tomatoes contrast with celery and cucumbers to make this a light, easy-to-prepare and easy-on-the-budget summer meal. It can be served warm, right after mixing, or be kept in the …

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One Thing We All Agree On …

Heading into summer = a wonderful time. And no matter how much extraneous snow may continue to fall, nothing can dampen the spirit of the truly gung-ho. This is the time when calendars come out, the grand trips are planned and all the winter’s empties head to the recycling depot for a sweet boost of …

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Lunar satellite collision

The month of May is over, and so is observing deep-sky objects such as nebulas and galaxies. The only stellar objects in the sky that are of interest to amateur astronomers are the moon, sun, Jupiter, Saturn and a handful of stars and clusters. Saturn is moving quickly toward the horizon and will soon disappear …

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Successful Perennial Gardening, All-Summer-Long

Perennial gardening has long been a favoured pastime for Yukon gardeners. Now is the perfect time to take a good look at the perennials in your garden, decide which perennials to plant where, shuffle existing plants around your garden and fill in empty spaces with new favourite varieties. Perennial gardens can look stunning, from early …

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Unleash the Ladybugs

Last week, I spotted a ladybug while visiting a garden in Dawson City. It was rather exciting to see a ladybug that far North and, not being a resident there, I asked whether sighting ladybugs is a frequent occurrence or rather something unusual. No one seemed to know, but it does seem to indicate that …

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Maintain Your Greenhouse Well

Understanding good greenhouse techniques encourages healthy plant growth and, as the growing season is well on its way, it would be a good time to reassess your plants’ performance to see if there are areas which can be tweaked for better results. Consistent care and monitoring the plants’ growth contributes to good cultural practices. If …

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Taking Note of Good Peas

If you like peas, and many Yukon gardeners must for they can be found in most gardens, you’ve had lots of company throughout history. Dried peas found at an archeological site near Thailand have been carbon-dated to 9750 BC according to the Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development Information pamphlet regarding fresh produce. Eating fresh peas …

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The New Faces of Dawson

While it’s rare to find a weekend in the Dawson summer when there’s not a major event, things do tend to slow down a bit after the Discovery Day weekend and the Yukon Riverside Arts Festival. The next big thing here is the Klondike International Outhouse Race, but that doesn’t take place until Labour Day …

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Is There Anything Up There?

As the end of May approaches, and June begins, we notice darkness at midnight. Living in the 60-degree latitude and above means that in the months of June, July and the first week of August, the sky doesn’t even get truly dark. Does this mean that northern astronomers will be putting all of their gear …

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Bugged!

Bug time: The sun is flirting with the edge of the mountain and the heat is leeching out of the day. Insects, paralyzed by the August brilliance, begin to rise from their shelters, bobbing in the evening air like dust motes caught in the shaft of light from a crack in the window blinds. Encouraged …

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H2O 101

Now that we are almost at the end of June, I find my plants are growing very fast. I’ve already harvested the first of my Tumbler tomatoes at the end of May, as well as some of the chili peppers. Regarding peppers and cucumbers, I am harvesting the fruit on the smaller side thus giving …

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The Right Time, The Right Place

With the hot weather this past Victoria Day weekend, I planted all my vegetable seeds. But my vegetable transplants are still getting the deluxe care treatment, kept in a cold frame or the greenhouse until I’m sure the last of the frost is past. In some of the Yukon’s outlying areas, this could be as …

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The low of coming home

I don’t like to admit it, but I hate the feeling I get coming back home after a long motorcycle trip. There is so much stuff everywhere, routines become bad things instead of good things, and all I can think of is setting in place plans to get away again. Stuff is probably the biggest …

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Adios, Corona.

Who isn’t familiar with the concept of the Lawnmower Beer? This is just the one beer, a cool and refreshing drink, the perfect reward for a salty upper lip and grass-stained shoes. The main purpose of this particular beer is to be thirst quenching, and as Stephen Beaumont from the Beer Connoisseur points out, the …

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Two Sports in One

Normally the summer season is relatively quiet on Whitehorse’s biathlon range, but not this year. A partnership between the Contagious Mountain Bike Club and Biathlon Yukon has created a new way for Yukoners to make use of the range. Bike biathlon races have been taking place each Monday in August to the delight of local …

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Steely Determination: Racing the Yukon River Quest

There is a strong current heading north towards Dawson and it is not just that of the Yukon River. Sixty-nine teams are registered in this year’s Yukon River Quest with a voltage of energy in those paddling arms that will make that river sizzle. The mission statement of the Yukon River Paddling Association is “To …

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How Others See Us PDF

It’s always interesting to learn how other people see us. Three creative spirits passed our way a couple of weeks ago and left us with some thoughts connected to our sense of place. Iain Baxter& said he thought the drive to Dawson was like living in a Monet painting. I would have picked one of …

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