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The Cancan: From Paris to the Klondike Gold Rush

The Legacy of the Klondike Cancan

The cancan that began as an 1830s dance craze in Paris was a direct revolt against the rules imposed by men, society, press, clergy and narrow-minded citizens. From the beginning the cancan was a statement, and it became a...

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Can You Do the Cancan, Kate?

During the 1890s, the United States was a melting pot of entertainment – and vaudeville became the perfect vehicle to showcase this wealth of diversity. From New York to Victoria, B.C., vaudeville reigned supreme as the...

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The Cancan Under Arrest

Appearing nightly in vaudeville, burlesque, ballets and operas, on tiny rustic stages of the Wild West mining camps and in the frontier theatres of the Pacific Coast, by the 1870s the cancan was in North America to stay.When the...

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The Cancan as Theatrical Spectacle

On June 20, 1819 the composer who was destined to pen the cancan theme song was born.  His name was Jacques Offenbach.  Born in Cologne, Germany, he grew to be a virtuoso cellist.  At 14 he was accepted into the Paris...

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The dance craze with a kick!

In her book “DANCING” Lilly Grove describes the invention of the chahut which evolved into the cancan.  “About 1830, a stage dancer called Mazarie played the part of a monkey in the Theatre de la Porte St. Martin.  He invented...

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The Laundress and the Kick

Although women of Paris played an integral role in the French Revolution, once the dustsettled they were given a stern message by the new men in power: Stay home, tend to the children and leave the important business of...

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