Wildlife Viewing Events

Seeing wildlife is often the highlight of a trip in Yukon. Yukon enjoys many special northern species not common or not found in lower latitudes. Whether it is moose, caribou, Gyrfalcons, swans, or rare plants you wish to see…

What’s on the river? – A winter warm-up to the Christmas Bird Count

It’s snowy and cold outside, and most of the Yukon’s migratory birds, such as swans, pretty yellow warblers, ducks and shorebirds, have long fled the territory. There’s always a few species, however, that linger. A favoured habitat for some of these birds is the Yukon River, just below the Rotary Centennial Bridge (“blue bridge”) near …

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See the Amazing Journey

Now’s the time to visit the Whitehorse fish ladder. This month the Yukon River Chinook salmon are migrating through Whitehorse, and the Whitehorse Rapids Fishway, located in Riverdale at the end of Nisutlin Road,is a good place to seem them in action. The wooden fish ladder is the longest of its kind in the world …

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Wild Times

“They’re [cranes] a much more delicate bird, compared to the swans,” says Carrie McClelland, a wildlife viewing biologist with Environment Yukon. “They stand three and a half to four feet tall, with a six foot wingspan, but they only weigh around seven or eight pounds. They’re very slender.” Lesser sandhill cranes migrate each year from …

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You Know It’s Spring When the Swans Arrive

“Last year was a big year,” says Scott Cameron, Environment Yukon’s Wildlife Viewing Technician. “We were up to 2,000 swans every day for a few days.” The height, he says, was April 9, when 2,200 were counted out on M’Clintock Bay. Typically that number is closer to 1,200. “And early too – usually you expect …

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Sandhills on Demand

A quarter million sandhill cranes! When, anywhere in this territory, do we have the opportunity to see a quarter million anything? Caribou? Nope. People? Not even close. Trees? Well, probably, but trees aren’t typically very active; they don’t really provide a spectator sport, as it were. But a quarter million sandhill cranes, flying overhead in …

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