amous Peaches

SUBHEAD: A breakfast fit for the fit

by Don Graham

I normally buy two cases of Canadian grown peaches to last me one winter. They generally cost anywhere from $18 to $27 per case. My preferred variety is freestone peaches, where the pit is easy to remove.

I store them in the basement or a cool dry place until they ripen. A slight squeeze will confirm ripe-ness, but the best way is to sample a few and gain first-hand knowledge through taste. I remove over-ripe peaches from the box, cut off the bad parts, and eat them.

When I’m ready prepare my peaches, fill a sink full of ice-cold water and add a couple trays of ice cubes. To this, I add two tablespoons of salt, a handful of sugar, and a good squirt of white vinegar—this keeps peaches from darkening.

I slice peaches in half from the ‘bum crack’, remove the pit, and immerse both halves in the water to cool. I remove the peaches and dry them a bit before arranging them on trays covered with paper towel or wax paper.

I sprinkle a light coating of sugar onto the halved peaches, and quickly place the tray in the freezer. Once the peaches are frozen, I remove them from the tray and store them in Ziploc bags, 17.7 x 19.5 cm, and put it back into the freezer.

To eat, place in mouth and bite down hard.

Or you can do it how I do it the way I do it, I take half a peach and slice it into three pieces and arrange them on the outside edge of my toast plate. Sprinkle a bunch of frozen blueberries into the centre. Raspberries or strawberries will also do.

Nuke them for five to six minutes on thaw cycle, remove from microwave; peel the skin off the peaches and place the fruit in a bowl on top of oatmeal, and add half a banana, plus some pineapple. Top it off with a bit of milk, no sugar required.

Put a slice of toast with real butter and unpasteurized honey on the used plate and you’ve got a breakfast fit for the fit.

Just think, you have now eaten two-and-a-half to three of the 10 servings of fruits and vegetables you need each day.

Don Graham is a Whitehorse-based peach eater

Photo: stock image of peaches

No caption neede

I normally buy two cases of Canadian grown peaches to last me one winter. They generally cost anywhere from $18 to $27 per case. My preferred variety is freestone peaches, where the pit is easy to remove.

I store them in the basement or a cool dry place until they ripen. A slight squeeze will confirm ripe-ness, but the best way is to sample a few and gain first-hand knowledge through taste. I remove over-ripe peaches from the box, cut off the bad parts, and eat them.

When I’m ready prepare my peaches, fill a sink full of ice-cold water and add a couple trays of ice cubes. To this, I add two tablespoons of salt, a handful of sugar, and a good squirt of white vinegar—this keeps peaches from darkening.

I slice peaches in half from the ‘bum crack’, remove the pit, and immerse both halves in the water to cool. I remove the peaches and dry them a bit before arranging them on trays covered with paper towel or wax paper.

I sprinkle a light coating of sugar onto the halved peaches, and quickly place the tray in the freezer. Once the peaches are frozen, I remove them from the tray and store them in Ziploc bags, 17.7 x 19.5 cm, and put it back into the freezer.

To eat, place in mouth and bite down hard.

Or you can do it how I do it the way I do it, I take half a peach and slice it into three pieces and arrange them on the outside edge of my toast plate. Sprinkle a bunch of frozen blueberries into the centre. Raspberries or strawberries will also do.

Nuke them for five to six minutes on thaw cycle, remove from microwave; peel the skin off the peaches and place the fruit in a bowl on top of oatmeal, and add half a banana, plus some pineapple. Top it off with a bit of milk, no sugar required.

Put a slice of toast with real butter and unpasteurized honey on the used plate and you’ve got a breakfast fit for the fit.

Just think, you have now eaten two-and-a-half to three of the 10 servings of fruits and vegetables you need each day.