This is a wine trend that anyone could enthusiastically embrace – wine and chips! Planning a casual night of watching a show or reading by the fire welcomes a glass of wine and a little snack into the evening. But the snack suggestions with wine are often fussy and complicated. Hard-to-find ingredients and instructions that encourage you arranging snacks into tiny pieces of art, is fun if you are in the mood for it but, if you want a charming and simple evening, wine and chips to the rescue!

Let’s start with the classic chip flavours: original or salt ‘n’ vinegar. Both of these flavours can actually pair well will a variety of wines. Original chips are a perfect pair with Cabernet Sauvignon. Many original flavour chips have a dominant salty and fatty taste so they are wonderful with the full body of a Cabernet Sauvignon.

Root:1 Cabernet Sauvignon from Chile ($17.10) is a great choice here.

In the wine community, the most popular pairing to talk about is salt ‘n’ vinegar chips and sparkling wine. When it comes up, and it does in every wine-nerd gathering, everyone starts passionately arguing over their personal selections from the possible combinations.

Really, they are all delicious if you have a sparkling wine that is dry. Look at the label showing the price at the liquor store, it will give a sweetness value, getting a sweetness of 0 is best for this combo.

A good choice is Anna Spinato Prosecco from Italy ($19.05). But the chip selection really matters here. Since a sparkling wine tends to have a lighter body, you want to choose a lighter chip, like Pringles, instead of a Kettle Chip, whose fat content would crush sparkling wine.

Some other chip flavours have been tested against wine with delicious results. Black pepper and lime chips are excellent with Sauvignon Blanc. But, Cheezies or Cheetos also work with Sauvignon Blanc. If either of these snacks are your flavour, then The Ned from New Zealand ($18.70) is a great choice.

Since it is winter, red wines are probably more on the “to-drink” list. A Malbec or Carmenere would be delicious with balsamic vinegar and sweet onion chips. Punto Final from Argentina ($18.95) is worth trying here. Or, if Pinot Noir is the style of wine that suits your taste, try Underwood Pinot Noir from the USA ($21.20) with sweet chili and sour cream chips. It is unlikely that you will be disappointed with this selection.

There are endless ways that wine and chips can come together into wonderful, tasty combinations. These suggestions are a great way to get started. I love having wine and chip gatherings, so there are even more chips and even more wine that can be tried in different combinations. Delicious research to do so you are ready with the perfect combos for your next movie night.