You have laid the foundation for your success by surrounding yourself with a support system, found classes or a workout that you enjoy, and scheduled your workouts into your weekly or daily plans.

Possibly, by now, you are starting to get bored by the program you started off with. Hopefully that program is getting a little easier.

Well, here I am to introduce you to, or remind you of, Tabata training.

Tabata training is a Japanese method of training which is actually quite similar to HIIT (high-intensity interval training) as I have talked about before.

It is a type of metabolic training that shocks your body into burning fat and working the muscles in a short period of time. Your heart rate is high, your muscles are quickly fatigued, and the workout is easy to mix up and keep interesting.

The rules for Tabata are quite simple. Select an exercise and complete as many repetitions as possible in 20 seconds. Then rest for 10 seconds and repeat this eight times, for a total of four minutes.

Try the following example for a complete total body workout that takes only 20 minutes total. Or, add one of these four minute sets at the end of your next workout.

Let me know how it goes for you!

1. Pushups (20 seconds on, 10 seconds off. Repeat eight times)

2. Crunches (20 seconds on, 10 seconds off. Repeat eight times)

3. Air squats (20 seconds on, 10 seconds off. Repeat eight times)

4. Skipping or toe taps (20 seconds on, 10 seconds off. Repeat eight times)

5. Plank hold (20 seconds on, 10 seconds off. Repeat eight times)

In case you have missed or forgotten about how to complete a HIIT cardio session, it is also a form of metabolic training – a quick, simple, intense way to get your heart rate up and efficiently burn fat.

Your goal for HIIT training is to get your heart to recover quicker during the “rest” periods of 30 seconds. The faster your heart rate comes back down, the more fit your cardiovascular system is getting.

1. Complete a warm up on any cardio machine for five minutes at a steady pace.

2. Go as fast as you can for 30 seconds.

3. Slow down to a slow pace or simply stop for 30 seconds.

4. Repeat 10 times from fast pace.

5. Cool down at a comfortable pace for five minutes to total 20 minutes.

These are both very intense types of training methods and you should introduce them into your workout at an introductory level.

You will find your body getting exhausted quickly, which is normal. Simply adjust your level as needed and don’t push yourself too hard the first time out.

Let your body tell you how hard to go. Introduce these two types of training a couple times a week and they will be sure to shock your body into your next stage of fitness.

This column is provided by Peak Fitness. You can reach Mrs. Lee Randell, an ACE certified advanced health and fitness specialist and personal trainer, at www.peakfitnessyukon.com.

This column is provided by Mrs. Lee Randell, independent fitness consultant, who is an ACE certified advanced health and fitness specialist and personal trainer. You can reach her at www.mrsleerandell.com.