Off the land

Living the Yukon Lifestyle often includes a healthy measure of self-reliance. Whether that is farming, wild harvesting, hunting and fishing, energy production and more we share insight from Yukonners.

Sauces & pâtés

Nose to tail : Don’t overlook the offal when meal-planning this winter

Offal —literally “off-fall”— refers to those parts of an animal carcass that have fallen off during butchering. While muscles represent more than a third of the weight of cattle, by-products including side meats, bones, skin, and intestines constitute most of the animal body. The brain, the trotters (aka feet), kidney, liver, sweetbreads (pancreas) and tripe …

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Cranberry Almond Roll

Cranberry bounty

Old-fashioned jelly roll, made with cranberry jam, not jelly, and finished with whipped cream, Amaretto and toasted sliced almonds.

Birthday Pairings, Campground Treats

Jennifer’s (Free Pour Jenny) cocktail and an appetizer. The cocktail’s bright, sharp and tart. Something cheesy immediately suggested itself. 

Growing young farmers

In 2020, when the Yukon closed its borders to the outside world due to COVID-19, Sundog Retreat owners Andrew Finton and his partner, Heather, found an opportunity in the challenge. They created the Sundog Veggies project.

The secret to composting

We all know we should compost. It is the right thing to do, even in bear country. Composting is the natural process of decay.

Adaptive strategies

During this bizarre year of COVID constraints, home cooks have had to develop adaptive culinary behaviours to increase our success in the kitchen. Sometimes key ingredients for a recipe simply weren’t available, so we acquired new competencies. We became masters of substitution.

For peat’s sake

Peat moss is commonly used around the garden. But what is it really?

Tackle box or junk box?

The water is still hard and ice-fishing is good, but now is the time to take out all your open water gear and do some maintenance and organizing. You could get by without a gear inspection, but come July you’ll hate yourself for the condition of your tackle and its containers. IEventually, we all have …

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Bringing local food to Yukoners

Farming in the Yukon comes with a few other unique obstacles, including producing food with wildlife at the doorstep.

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